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Month: September 2017

Trouble Seeing the Fine Print? Here are Your Options…

Every good pair of eyes eventually gets old and with age comes a condition called presbyopia. Presbyopia, which usually begins to set in some time around 40, occurs when the lens of the eye begins to stiffen, making near vision (such as reading books, menus, and computer screens) blurry. You may have this age-related farsightedness if you notice yourself holding the newspaper further and further away in order to make out the words, and you may begin to experience headaches or eyestrain as well. 

The good news is, presbyopia is very common. It happens to most of us eventually and these days there are a number of good options to correct it. First of all, let’s take a look at what causes the condition.

What Causes Presbyopia?

As the eye ages, the natural lens begins to lose its elasticity as the focusing muscles (the ciliary muscles) surrounding the lens have difficulty changing the shape of the lens. The lens is responsible for focusing light that comes into the eye onto the retina for clear vision. The hardened or less flexible lens causes the light which used to focus on the retina to shift its focal point behind the retina when looking at close objects. This causes blurred vision. 

Presbyopia is a progressive condition that gets worse with time. It is a refractive error just like myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness) and astigmatism. 

Signs of presbyopia include:

  • Blurred near vision
  • Difficulty focusing on small print or close objects
  • Eyestrain, headaches or fatigue, especially when reading or doing close work
  • Holding reading material at a distance to see properly
  • Needing brighter light to see close objects

Presbyopia can be diagnosed through an eye exam. 

Treatments for Presbyopia

There are a number of options for presbyopia treatment which include glasses, contact lenses or surgery. 

Glasses

The most common form of correction is eyeglasses. Reading glasses adjust the focal point of the target to reduce the focusing demand on the eyes. A side effect of the convex lenses is that they also magnify the target. For some, reading glasses are sufficient to improve close vision. Others, especially those with another refractive error, require more complex lenses. 

Bifocal or multifocal lenses, including progressive addition lenses (PALs), offer a solution for those with nearsightedness or farsightedness. These lenses have two or more prescriptions within the same lens, usually in different areas, to allow correction for distance vision and near vision within the same lens. While bifocals and standard multifocals typically divide the lenses into two hemispheres (or more), requiring the patient to look in the proper hemisphere depending on where they are focusing, with an unattractive contour calling attention to the presbyopia portion of the lens, progressive lenses provide a progressive transition of lens power creating a smooth, gradual change. Some people prefer progressive lenses for aesthetic reasons as they don’t have a visible line dividing the hemispheres.

Contact Lenses

Like glasses, contact lenses are also available in bifocal and multifocal lenses. Alternatively, some eye doctors will prescribe monovision contact lens wear, which divides the vision between your eyes. Typically it fits your dominant eye with a single vision lens for distance vision and your weaker eye with a single vision lens for near vision. Sometimes your eye doctor will prescribe modified monovision which uses a multifocal lens in the weaker eye to cover intermediate and near vision. Newer contact lens technology is making both lenses multifocal, and therefore doctors are becoming less dependent on monovision. Sometimes monovision takes a while to adjust to.

Based on your prescription, your eye doctor will help you decide which option is best for you and assist you through the adjustment period to determine whether this is a feasible option. Since there are so many baby boomers with presbyopia nowadays, the contact lens choices have expanded a lot within recent years.

Surgery

There are a few surgical treatments available for presbyopia. These include monovision LASIK surgery (which is a refractive surgery that works similar to monovision glasses or contact lenses), corneal inlays or onlays (implants placed on the cornea), refractive lens exchange (similar to cataract surgery, this replaces the old, rigid lens with a manufactured intraocular lens), and conductive keratoplasty (which uses radio waves to reshape the cornea in a noninvasive procedure). 

Medication – On the Horizon

There are currently clinical trials with promising early results that are testing eye drops that restore the flexibility of the human lens. It could be possible that in the near future eye drop prescriptions could be used to reduce the amount of time that people have to use reading glasses or contact lenses. 

These procedures vary in cost, recovery and outcome. If you are interested in surgery, schedule a consultation with a knowledgeable doctor to learn all of the details of the different options. 

As people are living longer, presbyopia is affecting a greater percentage of the population and more research is being done into treatments for the condition. So if your arm is getting tired from holding books so far away, see your eye doctor to discuss the best option for you. 

4 Things You Can Do to Reduce Your Risk of Glaucoma

by Jamie Peters

Currently, more than three million Americans have glaucoma, a condition that stems from high intraocular pressure. Glaucoma is often asymptomatic in its early stages, making it difficult to detect. In today’s post, your expert glaucoma treatment clinic, Vision Solutions, shares four ways you can protect your eyes from the threat of glaucoma:

Prevent Glaucoma

1. Know Your Family History

Heredity is a major risk factor for glaucoma. If any of your relatives have had this disease, you may be at a higher risk too, which means you should undergo regular glaucoma screenings.

2. Have Regular Eye Exams

If glaucoma runs in your family, it is essential to get regular eye care. This means you should undergo comprehensive eye exams at least once a year, which will enable us to keep an eye on your visual health and promptly detect any changes, including those that signal glaucoma. The sooner we detect glaucoma, the better chances we have of halting its progression.

3. Lead a Healthy Lifestyle

Exercising regularly and eating a well-balanced diet helps maintain your intraocular pressure. This is why your reliable eye doctor may recommend an exercise program and diet changes as part of your preventive care plan.

4. Wear Protective Eyewear When Necessary

Eye injuries or accidents may increase the pressure inside your eyes, putting you at risk of developing glaucoma. This is why we recommend wearing safety goggles whenever you are using power tools. It’s also a good idea to remove your contact lenses when swimming. In addition, we advise wearing proper safety eyewear when engaging in contact sports, such as basketball, football, or hockey.

For more ways to reduce the risk of glaucoma, call us at (619) 461-4913 or complete our form. We serve La Mesa, CA, and surrounding areas.

Do’s and Don’ts to Keep Your Eyeglasses in Good Shape

by Caroline Cauchi, OD

At Vision Solutions, our exquisite eyeglasses are made of high-quality materials that provide improved visual acuity. To ensure your glasses last for many years, abide by the following do’s and don’ts:

Good Shape

Do: Wash Your Hands Thoroughly

Washing your hands helps prevent hand-eye transmission of debris and microorganisms, reducing the risk of lens scratches and eye infections. Always use antimicrobial soaps. Afterward, rinse your hands thoroughly and dry them with a lint-free cloth.

Do: Have Regular Eye Exams

Different types of eyeglasses have specific instructions about usage, care, and maintenance. Apart from establishing your correct lens prescription, an eye exam is also a good opportunity for you to get a step-by-step tutorial on how to care for your specs.

Don’t: Use Coarse Material to Wipe Them

Eyeglasses typically come standard with a handy, microfiber cloth. You may use this to remove fog, dust, or debris from your glasses. Avoid using shirt-ends, towels, or other coarse materials, as these can damage your lenses.

Do: Clean Your Glasses Meticulously

Most eyeglasses may be cleaned with lukewarm tap water and dishwashing liquid. Rinse them first under a gentle stream of tap water. Then, use a few drops of dishwashing detergent to remove accumulated dirt from your specs. Lastly, rinse the soap suds and dry your glasses with a lint-free towel.

Don’t: Use Other Cleaning Detergents

Your eyeglass material may not be compatible with certain substances. If you are having a hard time removing dirt or debris, it’s best to bring your specs to your reliable eye doctor or optometrist.

For more eyeglass care dos and don’ts, call us at (619) 461-4913 or complete our form to schedule an appointment. We serve La Mesa, CA.

Aging Eyes and Driving Safety 

Even if you don’t have any eye or vision problems, the natural process of aging affects your ability to see and react to visual stimuli. It’s important to know the impact the aging can have on your eyes and vision so you can take the necessary precautions to stay safe and protect your eyes.

Driving is one activity that can pose a high risk as safe driving requires not only good vision, but also intact cognition and motor response. As we age, reflexes, reaction time and vision begin to deteriorate, which can impair one’s ability to drive safely, particularly under conditions such as bad weather, twilight glare, or nighttime darkness. Here are some ways that your ability to drive can be impaired as you age and some safety tips to help you to stay safe on the roads. 

The Aging Eye

As we age, the eye and vision naturally begin to experience a decline. The pupils in the eye, which allow light to enter, begin to shrink and dilate less, allowing less light to enter the retina. This causes reduced night vision. Additionally, some of our peripheral vision diminishes along with our ability to see moving objects. 

Due to deterioration of the cornea and clouding of the lens of the eye, glare becomes more disruptive and contrast sensitivity is reduced, making it harder to perceive images clearly. General imperfections in vision called higher-order aberrations cause a general decline in vision that can’t be corrected with glasses or contact lenses. Additionally, our reaction times slow, adding motor complications to the visual ones. Dry eyes also becomes a bigger problem with age as the lacrimal glands don’t produce as many tears to keep the eyes moist. Many of these symptoms may be present without the individual even noticing a decline and can all contribute to increased risk – for the driver, and others on the road.

If you add in any other vision problems such as cataracts, glaucoma or macular degeneration which are age-related diseases that gradually reduce vision, you can have a serious danger on your hands. 

Avoid Distractions

The biggest driving distraction in our day and age is cell phone usage. While many states and provinces have created laws which forbid driving and texting or holding a phone, it is not universal, and this still causes countless accidents and deaths that could be easily avoided. Even hands-free options distract you from the road and put you at risk. If you must use your phone to speak, dial or text, pull over first.

Plan Ahead

If you can avoid driving at night or on hazardous roads with sharp turns, inadequate lighting or that are unfamiliar to you, you will be better off. Plan to make first time trips during the day when you can clearly see street signs and landmarks or take a practice trip with a loved one. 

Purchase Night Vision Glasses

There are glasses available that can help to reduce the glare at night and enable better night time vision. Speak to your optometrist about whether this is a good option for you.

Turn Vents Down

Car vents can also cause discomfort, eye irritation and create greater vision hazard, as the air blowing at the eyes can impair vision or cause watering, especially when the eye are already dry. 

Maintain Good Eye Health

Make sure that you get your eyes checked on a regular basis and that any eye conditions you have are being treated and monitored. Good nutrition, exercise and overall healthy habits will help to protect and heal your eyes as well. Further, listen to your instincts, if you feel unsafe driving or if your doctor (or family members) tell you it’s time to hand in the keys, think about utilizing other means of transportation to get around. 

Many times people are able to pass their vision test at the driver’s license bureau which gives them a false sense of security, but in reality they are not seeing well, especially at night or in bad weather. In many areas there are courses available for senior citizens to test out driving skills with instructors who do an evaluation and give feedback on their real abilities. It’s critical for seniors to speak to their eye doctors about their true vision level and any restrictions that they recommend. 

The key to eye health and safety is awareness. You can’t stop your eyes from aging but you can take the necessary precautions to ensure that you are protecting your eyes, yourself and those around you by knowing how your eyes and vision are affected.